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Protecting The Legal Interests Of Injured Hawaii Residents And Visitors Since 1973

Many thousands of military veterans receive care in government medical centers on a regular basis. After serving the nation as dedicated members of the armed forces, a veteran has the right to reasonably assume that the medical care received in such facilities will be offered according to the highest levels of safety and protocol. When a doctor error results in the death of a patient in Hawaii, family members are typically devastated, angry and left wanting to seek justice on behalf of their loved one.

A grieving woman recently filed a lawsuit, naming the United States as a defendant. She believes that medical negligence at an army medical center is responsible for her husband’s death. Her husband, a military veteran, was 55 years old when he died; reportedly, he had been a long-time patient at the facility.

Approximately five years ago in September, he began a series of visits to the Dwight D. Eisenhower Army Medical Center at Fort Gordon, complaining of tightness and congestion in his chest. His widow claims that he was never provided any treatment for his ongoing ailments. Sadly, in Dec. 2010, he suffered a heart attack that resulted in his death two days later. Results of an autopsy revealed that the man’s heart was severely enlarged when he died.

The woman contends that a failure to provide appropriate treatment for her husband’s condition led to his heart attack and death. An immediate family member who has suffered the untimely death of a loved one under similar circumstances of doctor error or medical negligence in Hawaii is able to pursue justice in the matter by filing a legal claim in a civil court. A first logical step to take in the process would be to discuss the details of one’s situation with an experienced medical malpractice attorney in the area.

Source: chronicle.augusta.com, “Lawsuit alleges medical malpractice at Dwight D. Eisenhower Army Medical Center“, Dec. 7, 2015