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Protecting The Legal Interests Of Injured Hawaii Residents And Visitors Since 1973

Suffering a concussion after a blow to the head is painful and disruptive enough. If you subsequently suffer a second or third concussion, however, the negative effects can increase exponentially. Car accident victims that suffer concussions can have their lives altered drastically in the blink of an eye – especially if it is not their first concussion.

Some effects of repeat head injuries

A study evaluating the effects of multiple head impacts on athletes and military personnel sheds some light on some of the possible consequences of repeated brain injuries. While tests on different groups had a variety of results, the general consensus is that repeated blows to the head can result in long-term diminishing cognitive ability.

These negative effects include things such as disturbances of memory, planning capacity, and visual memory. In extreme cases, repeated impacts to the head can result in personality disturbances and other neurological conditions with symptoms similar to Parkinson’s disease.

Traumatic brain injuries

If you hit your head hard enough to give yourself a concussion – as often happens in severe car accidents – you could suffer a traumatic brain injury that could change your life permanently.

Traumatic brain injuries damage the brain in unpredictable ways. Symptoms vary, and could include greater susceptibility to disease, diminished cognitive capacity, loss of senses, and more. According to some studies, only 26% of victims of traumatic brain injury see an improvement in their condition as time passes.

Our legal system is designed to give those who are injured by the negligence of others the ability to seek compensation for any injuries they suffer. If you have suffered a concussion due to a car crash, you can seek damages from the responsible party for any adverse effects that result from your concussion, in addition to your economic and psychological harm.

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