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Guns in Hawaii might be among defective products

A recent lawsuit was filed by a man who claims that a defective firearm caused him injury. Residents of Hawaii might wish to take note of the defective products case in order to determine if they own a similar firearm. The case pertains to alleged defects in the trigger and safety mechanism of the gun.

The man claims he was shot in his abdomen when the Remington R51 pistol he was holding discharged. The man alleges that he never pulled the trigger but that the weapon went off, causing a bullet to sear through his abdomen and into his pelvis, where it became lodged. Reports indicate that the injured man spent four weeks in the hospital and also had to undergo several surgeries due to his injuries. 

In addition to the gun's apparent firing without a trigger pull, the man's lawsuit claims that the grip safety feature on the gun is faulty. This feature is designed to prevent the weapon from firing unless the safety device has been manually disengaged. The man in this case claims that the safety feature on his gun failed to work. It was reported that a month after the incident, the Remington company issued a performance warning to its customers, rather than a safety defect alert.

The claim filed by the man asserts that the defective products could have been kept out of the hands of consumers if the Remington company had not rushed production, allegedly ignoring certain objections reportedly voiced by its design engineers. If someone in Hawaii has been injured due to a design failure on a firearm or through normal use of any other purchased product, he or she has a right to consult with legal professionals in the matter. Manufacturers, distributors and vendors can be held liable when they knowingly make a defective product available to consumers.

Source: guns.com, "Idaho man suffered injury due to defect in Remington R51, lawsuit says", Daniel Terrill, Aug. 7, 2015

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